Happy 2016 And The Great Disappearance Act

Spent a blissful two and a half weeks with my family in California and close friend in Texas (shout out to Kimmy dearest for taking me to NASA and feeding me brisket!) for the first time since moving to Japan. In the spirit of the holidays, my technology was turned off in order to properly revel in family and friend time. Needless to say, I ate EVERYTHING (the trespass of which I was already admonished for during Wednesday’s ballet class #YOLO #ITWASWORTHEVERYCALORIE #MYTUTUSTILLFITSIFISUCKITIN), but even better than food was the quality time I spent among the people who love and support me most in the world: my parents.

My dad took a significant amount of time off of work to take me to all manner of doctor’s and dentist’s appointments, drive me around, play games well past both our bedtimes, and watch all the movies and TV shows that we needed to catch up on. Mum’s schedule, being what it was, allowed for mostly afternoon jaunts but I’m grateful for every precious second I spent in their company. Oh, yes, and my sister 😉 She and I put up with each other marvelously well, all things considered.

So that brings me to the month before I was in the States, when the internet pulled a great disappearing act. What happens when you’ve been paying your bills on time, when your router set isn’t broken, and the only problem showing up is “Check with your provider”?

Something I learned about Japanese internet: you will be dealing with three separate companies (Finance, Internet Provider’s Provider, and said Internet Provider) none of which have any helpful English lines in place (NTT claims it does; does not; and only NTT Finance had anyone remotely fluent enough to provide the assistance I needed via the Finance side).

I dedicate this post to Mari from NTT Finance, who not only bullied NTT into releasing my information to me (thus saving me an extra seven business days per interaction, a total of 21 once totaled), but generally got S*** done. I have never met anyone with such a go-getter attitude this side of the Pacific. Where everyone else was like, “I’m not sure if I’m allowed to do that and I’m not going to ask my superior because this is the one way things have always been done”, Mari’s response was very Disney “Let’s see what we CAN do about this problem”. Sadly this only got me as far as: Well, it’s not NTT’s fault. It’s your provider’s.

To which my brilliant response was: I thought NTT was my provider.

And a witty repartee ensued.

NTT: No. We take care of the finance side and NTT East provides the service to a provider who then has you pay for the glory of signing a contract with them.

ME: So you haven’t choked my internet and it’s not a financial issue?

NTT: That’s about right, Ms. Customer.

ME: So who’s my provider?! I only ever received information from NTT!

NTT: Uh, we can’t disclose that information.

ME: Whaaaaa…. How am I supposed to solve anything?

NTT: …

So while I keep receiving bills for internet I’m theoretically supposed to be able to use… I don’t actually have internet and I am now currently leaching off my workplace.

I hope to update with all manner of Foreign Film Friday posts that never got published and photos from the holidays and travel information I amassed over said holidays… all of which are stuck on my American phone, but I can’t until my WIFI is back. Work doesn’t have WIFI, we just have the LAN connection chord of doom.

Hopefully this is resolved. Soon. >.>”

Resolved as of 11:40 am. Three cheers for being taught how to hack into your router and resetting the damn thing. YAY! \O/

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Foreign Film Fridays 03: The Fall (2006)

We are, all of us, the story and the storyteller. We are the villain and the hero of our own making. But what if the lines between fantasy and reality blurred until it became impossible to tell one from the other?

the-fall

Original Title: The Fall
Year: 2006
Country: India & USA
Language: English/Romanian
Subtitles: English
Length: 1hr 58min
Availability: Amazon

The Fall is a fantasy epic, filmed over the span of four years, with all the magical realism of a Gabriel Garcia Marquez novel and the visual beauty of a living, breathing art piece.  But more than just an artistic statement, this film grapples with emotionally charged themes that by no means make it a simple or lighthearted tale of redemption. If viewers are willing to take the plunge into the realm of moral ambiguity, this film more than delivers a masterful blend of philosophical inquiry and fantastical storytelling.

The two main protagonists are as disparate as human beings can be: the ever hopeful five-year-old Alexandria (Catinca Untaru) is no stranger to personal tragedy – already in her short life she has had to witness much pain and suffering – yet she maintains her childlike innocence in the face of all adversity; by comparison, her new found friend is a convalescing film star turned stuntman named Roy (Lee Pace). Roy is intent on ending his life by any means necessary… even if it means manipulating the one person who has come to care for him with all the love that a child’s heart can possess. Theirs is a fateful encounter that is as intense as it is brief. The Fall will leave you wanting more long after the credits roll.

The story-within-a-story device takes viewers to a neutral middle-ground wrought of fantasy and child-like imagination. It is only there that the two protagonists can engage in an allegorical discourse via mutual storytelling. With each day that passes, their dramatic tale grows until it blossoms into a beautiful secret that keeps each of them alive – but for different reasons. Roy, desperate to end his life, lives day-to-day just to accumulate the pills that Alexandria sneaks from the dispensary, which she in turn exchanges for more stories. All the while, she is unaware that her beloved storyteller is planning the final act of of his tale to end in a real life tragedy. The ending of this film is nothing short of sublime, passionate, and intriguing.

But perhaps the greatest triumph of The Fall is the palpable father-daughter chemistry between Catinca’s and Lee’s characters. More than the vivid cinematography or the intricate layering of reality upon fantasy upon reality, these two actors work surprisingly well together. They make the perfect bandit duo in their fantasy world and affectionate friends in the real world. Lee couldn’t have done better to portray himself as her fictional “long lost” bandit-masked father than if he really had been.

For those who have a hard time placing Roy’s actor, it is the one and only: the Lee Pace. With a face that not only blends fluidly from emotion to emotion but can also shift with ease on the gender spectrum, his acting skills are on a level that I have never before encountered. I didn’t realize how many films I had seen him in until I consulted The Google Machine for proof of his existence outside of Pushing Daisies. Apparently, I’d seen him in many, many films but had never realized. He looks like someone new each time, which I attribute more to his unique ability to assume entirely new sets of mannerisms for each of his characters than to a wardrobe department, although they did a stand up, ovation worthy job on The Hobbit for his character. I sincerely believe that he deserves any role he wants.

And not to be outdone by her incredibly talented cast member, Catinca is also quite the actress herself despite being so young. Perhaps it’s her inexperience and vitality that help her shine in such a heavy role. There are no pretenses. Even as she sobs for Lee Pace’s character to choose life over death, I am hard pressed to find a single moment when she is not 100% convincing. She is honest and raw, realistically so. Her childlike optimism and ingenuity have lent this film the perfect amount of innocence to counterbalance the darkness. And if you’re perceptive enough, you can see her growing up with the film: her height adjusting, her English skills improving, her affectionate bond with Lee developing on level within and -out of the role – all of it that much more endearing. The Fall was an excellent debut into the film industry for her, though I am rather sad to see that she has not secured many more roles since then. Maybe, that is for the better – seeing how so many child stars end up like Shia LaBeouf or Amanda Bynes.

The film is not without its gaffes but it is cleverly scripted so that viewers will gain fresh insight each time they re-watch to catch missed moments, segues, and facial expressions. In all, it is incredible in its scope and breadth of creativity. The melding of cultures, the subtle unfolding of its subplots, and the breathtaking candor with which it grasps a harsh and terrifying reality… if you have two hours to devote to this film, it will be well spent.

WARNING: Best watched not alone. This is not a film for the faint of heart as it requires significant courage to delve into the dark recesses of depression, outright manipulation, and suicide. Many reviewers who have scored this film poorly seem to be divided into two camps: the first being, the film is too dark and complex for them to follow on an emotional/intellectual level, and the second side can’t seem to understand the little girl’s broken English. In the first case, be assured that the film ends well even if it may not be the ending you had in mind; however, like all good art it will take you on an emotional, sensory adventure first. It will make you think (as well as feel) long and hard about certain issues. Those are not comfortable emotions or thoughts for many people to grapple with for 2 hours. I would say that it is as dark, if not darker than, Pan’s Labyrinth. Also, many of the scenes are stories that will rewrite themselves to reflect either Roy’s or Alexandria’s interpretation of the tale. If you fall into the category of the second case: there are subtitles available for those who are not auditory or who have trouble understanding Catinca’s charmingly accented English.

I put off watching this film for almost a year, mainly because a friend warned me that although it ended very well – on a good psychological point, she emphasized – this wasn’t the kind of film that anyone could watch without first being made to experience the emotional equivalent of a roller coaster ride. Normally, I’m all for art that sparks an inspirational revolution within the soul, mind, and heart; but something about the way she said it gave me pause for concern. She was right to warn me. I saw it for the first time with a group of friends who had mostly already seen it before. Everyone, except for myself and one other, were in the know about the story line and exactly how it would end… and they all passed me tissue after tissue, and eventually the whole damned box, as I devolved into a sobbing mess of humanity right along with the plot. Friends are the best.

To Be Continued…

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It has only been seven – now quickly going on eight – months into this new year and our family has yet to have a quiet moment. On top of unresolved issues that have built up, a few major family illnesses and a death have occurred in the past two weeks alone. I’m taking a four day hiatus to finish packing and resolving what I can before departure. This blogger is hanging up the will be back sign until then. In the meantime, please enjoy Bach’s Chaconne from Partita No. 2 as played by Hilary Hahn.

Fullerton Arboretum

Located in the upper North corner of Orange County, the city of Fullerton is best known for the following: a convenient 15 minute distance from Disneyland by car, Troy High School, Republicans, and the eponymous California State University off of Nutwood Avenue. Hordes of commuters and international students arrive each year to pursue higher education for an increasingly competitive job market, their options limited by geography and cost for the most part. It ranks as one of the best Business Administration degree granting institutions but the disparity in inter-departmental expenditure is more than obvious. Humanities and Arts will languish in the ages old archaic system of favoritism while the Business and Engineering colleges are garnished with grants and money willed by famous and/or rich alumni. This hierarchical system is seen around the world and not unique to Cal State Fullerton. It’s sadly bigoted and geared towards pumping out businessmen and professors – the socially acceptable and “successful” of our demographics – professions which most have neither the inclination nor the will to follow for personal reasons.

In the midst of this ages long war, the botanical gardens (otherwise known as the Arboretum) on campus grounds flourish through patron donations, which enables them to provide free entry to the community and not just its students. The grounds are breathtaking, lush, and full of surprises if you step off the beaten tracks. Its main gem and attraction is a Bodhi Tree presented to the university by the Dalai Lama in 2000. Many a person has rested their weary feet at its roots and shaded themselves from the oppressive California sun beneath its verdant foliage. Though not my personal favorite, the Bodhi Tree is nonetheless of great importance and something of a claim to fame for the school.

Summertime sees the ducklings born in the spring transformed into full grown adults as well as a host of seasonal flowers blooming bright and tall, the return of a well-loved crane to its ponds, and a host of children that visit the children’s corner on the grounds. My favorite flowers are sunflowers and seeing them at the entrance made me so excited to discover what else had grown since last I had been there in June. The best part, though, was seeing my mom go absolutely nuts over the Arboretum’s plant collection. As an amateur botanist with years of experience in home gardening and transplanting, she’s also a bit of an enthusiast on rare plants, making the Arboretum her own heaven on earth since each section is divided into geographical regions.

Parking at the Arboretum is also free but very limited. And as previously mentioned it is quite a family friendly destination: it hosts a children’s area complete with play stations, the Nikkei Japanese Heritage Museum, and a greenhouse with plants sold according to seasonal availability. I recommend this Southern California trip to anyone who wants to tour a university campus and escape into the greenery, too.

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Although accessible by the 91 or 57 freeways, be aware that most of the 91 carpool lanes have been turned into toll roads by greedy-politician-back-hand deals with equally (if not more so) greedy-and-soulless businessmen. If this sounds a tad bit bitter, please keep in mind that Californians have a special love-hate affair with their freeways. We have pretty steep taxes already and it’s a slap in the face to find out that some of the heaviest traffic carrying freeways (which are already in need of lane expansions to accommodate the heavy influx of commuters) are now charging for being used.

But I digress. More information on the Arboretum and events can be found by clicking here.

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My favorite flowers in all the world: they’re so big and bright and happy 😀 They always put a smile on my face!

Impromptu Op. 1 No. 1: The Hair Dresser’s Fantasie in E-flat Major

It was just one of those things that sort of happened: gathered around the table chatting about the proverbial life and taxes when out of the clear, wide, open blue…

“So did you really want a haircut?” Roberto asked, eyeing my frizzled mess with a discerning look. Earlier in our conversation my mother had remarked that I was unhappy with the current state of folic affairs – I hadn’t gotten a decent trim in, well, seven months and since my hair is deceptively thick it was long overdue for a touch up. I could tell his thoughts were going at a mile a minute; he knew exactly what he wanted to do.

“Um, yeah!” I still don’t know what compelled me but I’m very glad that I did. Was it a pre-midlife crisis building up? Was it the fact that at 22 the most adventurous thing I had ever done to my hair was bob it (albeit from a sober hair dresser). “Just surprise me!”

There was no time to take back a decision made on one and a half shots of spiced rum (shocking, I know. Light weights unite!). And that’s when both Roberto and Eddie got up at the same time, the two slightly tipsier than I was, but still in control of motor functions. “Oh my God, let’s do it.”

Jessie provided the kit: hair oil, mister, shears and… well all those other instruments from the picture above – didn’t quite catch their names. My previous hairdo was really, really outdated plus it was getting too long/monotonous for me even to care about doing much with it. Now I can’t wait to start playing with it again! Roberto you are absolutely fabulous. Anytime, any day, you just say the word and I’ll be your translator, guide, and host in Japan. Lots of love and gratitude XoxO ❀ And for anyone interested: Check out Roberto’s work at the  ULTA in Eastvale, California!

Artistry has always run strongly on my mother’s side but while previous generations have chosen professions in the more conventional music/art-related fields, it seems as if these young bloods have taken a shine to hair and cosmetology. Eddie only has to wait for his license to clear. My sister will be starting her courses just as soon as she graduates from high school. And, of course, Jessie. Best of luck in your exams on Tuesday, Jessica! With all of your hard work and enthusiasm, you will soon also be a wonderful hair dresser like Roberto and cousin Eddie.

Thanks for all of these beautiful memories 😀 And now time for a real impromptu in E-flat Major.

 

Preparing for an Overseas Adventure

Alright so you have booked the flight, packed your bags, and… now what? Exhilarating as travel can be, it’s also quite a pain to plan. Unless you’re the type to wing it (completely) then this post is not for you! For the rest of us who enjoy some measure of security and order, the following is a glorified check-list-tips-and-tricks hybrid post for the inexperienced traveler. Sometimes you learn the hard way but why suffer when you can let others do the suffering for you, eh? I prefer the good old vicarious method and so hopefully this can be useful to someone who is wondering what steps to take next on their adventure planning.

It’s a starter list of suggestions based on my own previous experience as a study abroad student but is quite adaptable to the months long backpacker. It should be enough to get your mind off and imagining about other possible matters you might have to settle before leaving your home country. Also, as cliche as the meme might be, the good old ’10 COMMANDMENTS OF TRAVEL’ comes in handy too 😉 Even if you are not a Type A, there will be times on your journeys – at some seemingly innocuous place – where you will come across an old fashion “WTH JUST HAPPENED?!” moment. Read through the commandments, brandish them on your heart, and depart knowing that you will not come back the same person who left through the front door. The travel gods have spoken; now onwards ho, my brave pioneers!

Ahem. Although the checklist was created by myself, the 10 Commandments for Travelers was taken from a colleague (Study Abroad Adviser Extraordinaire) at my former uni but even she can’t remember who gave it to her or who created it. Sadness. ‘Tis a mystery for the ages; the wit and candor of said author is first rate but doomed to be lost to obscurity. (I have modified it slightly, mostly in regards to gender) Click and enjoy!~

   the 10 commandments of travel

❀

::TRAVEL QUOTES SOUP FOR THE SOUL::

“We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.”
-T. S. Eliot

“Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home.”
-Matsuo Basho

“It is better to travel well than to arrive.”
-Buddha

“One travels more usefully when alone, because he reflects more.”
-Thomas Jefferson

“Life is an unfoldment, and the further we travel the more truth we can comprehend. To understand the things that are at our door is the best preparation for understanding those that lie beyond.”
-Hypatia

❀

And, of course, what trip would be complete without an epic playlist? With an endless supply of travel themed songs all set, you’ve got an epic-conquest-of-the-world worthy soundtrack to back you up. Solo road trips can be pretty monotonous in dead silence, which for me means drowsiness. Co-pilots are great for bickering, laughing, arguing, and discussing the finer points of philosophy/the meaning of life/university debt/unemployment/hashing out that last failed relationship/The Future… as well as for making sure that you keep sharp and on your toes. But as we all know, apart from pumping your body full of caffeine, it is actually quite hard to fall asleep to your favorite head bashing tune (Beethoven’s 5th anyone?). Plus, who doesn’t like creeping out the driver on the lane next to you with some oh so soothing renditions of heavy metal music-swaying while belting out your favorite lyrics? Normal, it’s over-rated. Anyway, here are some travel themed songs we all know and love. In the spirit of travel, they are compiled in an ever growing Spotify playlist.

Well, it’s less than a week until Departure Day… still so much packing left to do and not enough time. But if uni has taught me anything worthwhile, it is that I perform at well enough under pressure to function. Gah. Creative juices, where are you when I need you?! Curses!

🙂

This. Is. LACMA.

So you think you’ve seen it all, huh? Pffff. Please 😉

Best of all: The second Tuesday of the month is free general admission for the day (usually 11am-5pm). Regular admission price totals $15 (special exhibits start at $25 and up) with parking for the day coming in at an even $12. After 7pm, there is no charge. Children under 17 years are allowed free entry with accompanying adult every day (not just the first Tuesday of the month), which makes it a cheap and educational day trip for Angelenos and tourists alike!

LACMA is also closely situated to the Natural History Museum and the La Brea Tar Pits so come prepared with lots of energy and great enthusiasm for learning!

Generally I am not a fan of modern art – sorry! – but I will say that the mass of squiggly lines made out of clay spoke to me in ways that the disintegrated rhombus and hexagons did not. It was oddly a convoluted mess of all the unspoken words I had ever wanted to say and yet soothing at the same time. Did not look up the artist’s name as the lovely Diana and I were pressed for time (crown delivery that same day at 6pm so expediency was of the essence!) but I will say this: It fed my soul and my soul was happy for the time it had the privilege and pleasure to look upon the colorfully engaging linear art gracing LACMA’s austere white walls. Props to this artist and I’ll just have to come back sometime after JET to get her or his name down properly.

How to Pack for Long-Term Travel Part I

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introductionIt takes many types of people to make the world go round but to some extent or other we are all travelers by nature: curious, adaptable, resourceful, and of course survivors. Our species has spread and evolved across every continent and settled in as varied a geographic setting as any that can be found on planet Earth.

But these days we travel more so for business or pleasure than for outright survival, still travelers we remain: from the casual weekend family visit and the cross country road trip to the international months-long backpacking affair and the long-term immigration settling. Unlike our medieval ancestors who were more likely to be born, raised, and die in the village/town/city of their birth, current generations are uprooting more frequently than ever before in history. Mainly for economic reasons (ironically, I cannot find a job in the country that prides itself on perpetuating the ideal of the American Dream even with a degree), which make experimentation with international unions quite popular because they facilitate this kind of uprooting for the citizens of participating such as in the case of the European Union. As such you are most likely reading this article because you are contemplating making such a move yourself and don’t know where to start. Welcome!

This article will be focusing on travel packing for upwards of a year or more but is easily applicable to the semester study abroad student stint. It’s broken down into three easy steps that will cover the initial essentials of packing and how to choose what you will be taking abroad with you.

resesarchPut those research skills to good use, my lovelies. Find out everything you can about your destination: geography, geology, and the highest/lowest/average recorded temperature are all great places to start. Become a fluent converter of Celsius (also known as Centigrade in some countries) and Fahrenheit. You may even want to look up humidity levels because dry heat and humid heat are two different situations entirely. Trust me. As a native Californian I thought I could handle heat, after all the running joke in this state is that California has only two seasons: summer… and not summer. That is until I found myself in Tokyo’s muggy, typhoon mess and between swimming in my own sticky sweat vs weather that was twenty to thirty degrees hotter but drier, I choose the latter any day. So… prepare yourself! Even when you think you’ve got something, turns out the differences might surprise you, too.

For those going to countries with significantly colder weather: although you may feel like investing in TWO suitcases just to accommodate all of your winter regalia, first stop and investigate what options, if any, your new home country will have for you. Sometimes it’s cheaper to purchase it on location than it would be to pay charges for extra check-in baggage. In the event that your new home country will not be able to carry your size (Japan, if you’re a taller/larger/wider American female such as myself – woefully a comfortable medium in USA sizing is an extra large over there) just buy the jackets/boots here and have them shipped in a box. This will save you packing headaches down the road and can be a nice care package from and to yourself 😉

inventorySo what’s in the closet? Once you’ve established what kind of climate you will be up against, the next step is to take stock of what you already own, what will work, what won’t, and what you’ll need. This is the part where people start tearing out their hair. When you’ve settled down somewhere for a comfortable amount of time and have a space of your own that you think of as permanent, you tend to settle down and accumulate stuff. And fast. This goes for furniture and living utensils as well as clothes. Rarely, if ever, do people take a mass inventory of their life’s accumulation for the sole purpose of tossing it out. Be honest, when was the last time you went about doing this?

However, this is also an amazing opportunity to donate all of your unwanted items: thrift shops, women’s shelters, religious organizations, and the Salvation Army will always welcome your used and well-loved items. If tight on cash yourself, you could always opt for the other route, which  is to sell your items as “vintage” on Etsy or eBay, but try donating what you can first to those in greater need than your own.

Start a list, draw it out, sticky notes… whatever helps you get organized.

weedingResearch. Check. Inventory. Check. Now comes the fun (or not so fun, depending on how indecisive you are)! Time to choose what to keep and what to give away/sell 😀 Below you will find an infographic from this neat website which is geared towards simplifying your closet weeding and it gives you a point of reference for what you can keep and what should get thrown out. Generally speaking, I love the flow chart style and it works if you promise not to make special allowances for a single item of clothing. Okay, well, maybe you can give yourself up to three passes but only those three >.>

Once you can mentally take a picture of everything you’ve got and everything you will most likely need to take, this will make it easier to purchase the appropriate type and amount suitcases for your trip. My rule of thumb is pack for a week and a half. Do your laundry more often and accumulate clothes over there as needed. It is astounding how little you need to actually survive. Most suitcases can’t carry much more without going over the weight limit so check with your airline and weigh as necessary.

closetweeding

 

And those are the first three steps to packing for long-term travel 😀 Next we’ll cover choosing suitcases and the lost art of packing them!

Till the next post!

Claremont Loop Trail

With the heat amping up exponentially to herald the start of the summer season, it can be pretty difficult to be out and about anywhere in Southern California between the hours of 11:30am and 6:00pm. But if you don’t mind leaving the house with the dawn to enjoy some mother nature, if you’re fond of exercising and hiking, then there are some beautiful locations all across our half of the state that you can take up for some tame adventure and complete well before the midday nightmare sets in all its glory 😉

They are easily found on this neat little website and information for this particular trail can be found by clicking here.

Nature is the best and cheapest therapist: plentiful in its beauty and ability to consume a soul bent on destroying all pent up emotions, it listens to your heart through the struggle you carry and in every last drop of strength it takes you to climb its craggy surfaces and dusty paths. And it forces you to face that which you would otherwise drown in distractions like books, tv, and internet.

Much as the name describes, the Claremont Loop is a single trail that loops round back to where it starts and contains overgrown side and hill paths. Easily accessible by car and on foot, it’s great training ground for uphill hiking and bicycling. Lots of friendly hikers with their dogs but keep an ear out for the bicyclists. All the ones I encountered weren’t considerate enough to attach bells or to ring them in order to warn hikers when they were rounding corners. So if you plan on bicycling just remember: do us all a solid and just ring the bell 😉

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Chris may be on the intelligence side of the military but he’s definitely got it in him to take on a citadel if need be.

Joshua Tree National Park

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Named after the area’s signature Yucca brevifolia, Joshua Tree National Park is located about two hours east of Los Angeles and features an abundance of desert wildlife as well as fantastic geology, making it the perfect pit stop for adventurous travelers who don’t mind going off the beaten track.

Rock climbers, photographers, nature enthusiasts, and geology students will have a blast climbing the gigantic granitic monoliths by using the unique erosion patterns that create accessible foot and hand holds across most of these features. It’s quite a work out. Upon reaching their summit, you can see for miles around and take in the beautiful desert landscape/scenery. JTNP might not be as well known as Death Valley National Park or the Mojave Preserve but it’s definitely more accessible, complete with visitor centers and designated parking areas all throughout the area for those who enter it by car.

Bicyclists and hikers get a reduced fee entry 7 day pass for $5 while visitors who come by car pay $15 for a week (or for a flat rate of $30 you can opt for the yearly pass).

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